Recent Changes

Tuesday, March 3

  1. page Materials for evaluation edited ... Materials from 2011-2012 http://blogging2.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mewxjib4/ Materials des…
    ...
    Materials from 2011-2012
    http://blogging2.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mewxjib4/ Materials designed to help teachers understand what wikis are and use them in class (Some elements not currently working)
    ...
    about Thanksgiving -- Not linking
    http://blogging.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mewxjdf8/ This is about tractors and is designed for an ESP class
    http://blogging2.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mzjssjg3/ Materials aimed at leaners getting out and about in Manchester
    (view changes)
    5:19 am
  2. page Materials for evaluation edited ... http://blogging2.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mewxjsmk/ A set of materials addressing particula…
    ...
    http://blogging2.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mewxjsmk/ A set of materials addressing particular language errors
    Materials from 2011-2012
    http://blogging2.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mewxjjj4/ Additional support materials to work with a course book in a primary ESL context
    http://blogging2.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mewxjib4/ Materials designed to help teachers understand what wikis are and use them in class (Some elements not currently working)
    http://blogging.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mewxjsdc/ These are about Thanksgiving -- Not linking
    (view changes)
    5:18 am

Friday, October 24

  1. page Materials for evaluation edited ... http://blogging2.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mewxjsmk/ A set of materials addressing particula…
    ...
    http://blogging2.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mewxjsmk/ A set of materials addressing particular language errors
    Materials from 2011-2012
    http://blogging.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mewxjjj4/http://blogging2.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mewxjjj4/ Additional support
    ...
    ESL context
    http://blogging.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mewxjib4/

    http://blogging2.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mewxjib4/
    Materials designed
    ...
    in class (Some elements not currently working)
    http://blogging.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mewxjsdc/ These are about Thanksgiving -- Not linking
    http://blogging.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mewxjdf8/ This is about tractors and is designed for an ESP class
    http://blogging.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mzjssjg3/http://blogging2.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mzjssjg3/ Materials aimed
    http://blogging2.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mewxjsg8/ A flipped classroom example designed for use on a mobile phone
    http://blogging2.humanities.manchester.ac.uk/mewxjkgc/ A course in Japanese for adults
    (view changes)
    9:16 am

Thursday, October 16

  1. page Formal -- informal edited ... I want to encourage my students to appreciate how much they are learning informally and encour…
    ...
    I want to encourage my students to appreciate how much they are learning informally and encourage them to do more of it (it's free, and they don't have much cash).
    Just adding a definition of informal learning that I found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Informal_learning
    ...
    the learner’s standpoint.standpoint*. Often it
    ...
    knowledge acquisition."
    Just read here (http://www.infed.org/informal_education/informality_and_formalization.htm) a couple of definitions that informal learning can be/is intentional on the part of the learner. How do we know, for sure??? But the learner has to 'let the learning happen' in some way.

    Also from here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formal_learning
    "Formal learning, normally delivered by trained teachers in a systematic intentional way within a school, academy/college/institute or university, is one of three forms of learning as defined by the OECD, the others being informal learning, which typically takes place naturally as part of some other activity, and non-formal learning, which includes everything else, such as sports instruction provided by non-trained educators without a formal curriculum.[1]"
    (view changes)
    10:17 pm
  2. page Formal -- informal edited http://www.infed.org/informal_education/informality_and_formalization.htm http://www.infed.org/i…
    http://www.infed.org/informal_education/informality_and_formalization.htmhttp://www.infed.org/informal_education/informality_and_formalization.htm
    This article is from the American Psychological Society and appears in Psychological Science and looks at incidental learning. I find this quite interesting as most sources point to the time it takes for immigrants to develop linguistic competence without formal learning and therefore focus on strategies for skill development.
    {Incidental Language Learning - Listening out of the corner of your ear.pdf}
    NOTES by Alison (Autumn 2014)
    Interested in this topic because:
    ...
    than formally (in side(inside the classroom).
    when I lived in Spain, I definitely consolidated the formal language lessons I was taking outside the classroom, incidentally, by going about my job of au pair.
    I want to encourage my students to appreciate how much they are learning informally and encourage them to do more of it (it's free, and they don't have much cash).
    Just adding a definition of informal learning that I found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Informal_learning
    "Informal learning is, by default, any learning that is not formal learning or non-formal learning. Informal learning is organized differently than formal and non-formal learning because it has no set objective in terms of learning outcomes and is never intentional from the learner’s standpoint. Often it is referred to as learning by experience or just as experience. For all learners this includes heuristic language building, socialization, inculturation, and play. Informal learning is a persistent and pervasive ongoing phenomena of learning via participation or learning via knowledge creation, in contrast with the traditional view of teacher-centered learning via knowledge acquisition."
    Also from here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formal_learning
    "Formal learning, normally delivered by trained teachers in a systematic intentional way within a school, academy/college/institute or university, is one of three forms of learning as defined by the OECD, the others being informal learning, which typically takes place naturally as part of some other activity, and non-formal learning, which includes everything else, such as sports instruction provided by non-trained educators without a formal curriculum.[1]"

    Will edit later.
    Is it possible to measure/identify informal learning?
    (view changes)
    9:46 pm
  3. page Levy article summary edited Text about {http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/images/en_US/covers/medium/9780198236313_140.jpg} Micha…
    Text about {http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/images/en_US/covers/medium/9780198236313_140.jpg}
    Michael Levy, Computer Assisted Language Learning: context and conceptualization. Oxford, Clarendon. 1997.
    Contents: 1. Introduction -- 2. CALL in context I: a historical perspective -- 3. CALL in context II: an interdisciplinary perspective -- 4. Conceptualization I:
    the cahpterCALL literature -- 5. Conceptualization II: the CALL Survey -- 6. Emerging themes and patterns of development -- 7. A tutor-tool framework -- 8. On the nature of CALL.
    Summary: "So far the development of Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) has been fragmented. The points of departure for CALL projects have been enormously varied, and when the projects have been written up, they rarely refer to those that have gone before. Michael Levy addresses this shortcoming, setting CALL work into a context, both historical and interdisciplinary. He is the first person in the field to consider CALL as a body of work. He also aims to identify themes and patterns of development that relate contemporary CALL to earlier projects. The author goes on to explore how CALL practitioners have conceptualized the use of the computer in language teaching and learning. He achieves this through a detailed review of the literature, and through the results of an international CALL Survey, where key CALL practitioners from 18 countries respond to questions on aspects of CALL materials development. Drawn from this rich source of information on actual CALL practice, Michael Levy analyses and expands on a tutor-tool framework. He shows this to be of value for a better understanding of methodology, integration of CALL into the curriculum, the role of the teacher and learner, and evaluation." (Taken from
    http://copac.ac.uk/search?isn=0198236328&rn=1)
    "A sense of the whole is imperative because in my view CALL practitioners and researchers have not really assimilated the work that has been done, nor appreciated its relevance for current work, a point also made by Last ( 1989: 14). Researchers have increasingly narrow specializations, and it is easy to lose sight of the broader picture. Moreover, CALL is interdisciplinary, and as such we need to be aware of developments in related disciplines. Other fields such as instructional design, artificial intelligence, and psychology will undoubtedly also have contributions to make. This is particularly important, I feel, because CALL abounds with one-off projects that are often not described in relation to other similar CALL projects, nor set in the broader context. A description can provide an appreciation of what has been achieved so far, and provide a sensible platform for a discussion of possible directions in the future" (Levy, 1997, p vii)
    "CALL is a relatively new, interdisciplinary field of study that has been subject to the influence of a number of other fields and disciplines. In addition to the fields of computing and language teaching/learning, which one would expect to have an impact on CALL, real or potential influences in the development of the field have included elements of psychology, artificial intelligence, computational linguistics, instructional technology and design, and human-computer interaction studies (see Table 3.1). Many of these disciplines are relatively new in themselves, having developed very significantly since World War II; they each have their own perspective and frame of reference, they often overlap and interrelate, and the extent to which any one should influence the development of CALL has not been determined." (Levy; 1997, p 47)

    (view changes)
    5:19 pm
  4. page Formal -- informal edited ... This article is from the American Psychological Society and appears in Psychological Science a…
    ...
    This article is from the American Psychological Society and appears in Psychological Science and looks at incidental learning. I find this quite interesting as most sources point to the time it takes for immigrants to develop linguistic competence without formal learning and therefore focus on strategies for skill development.
    {Incidental Language Learning - Listening out of the corner of your ear.pdf}
    NOTES by Alison (Autumn 2014)
    Interested in this topic because:
    my asylum seeker students seem to learn more informally (outside the classroom) than formally (in side the classroom).
    when I lived in Spain, I definitely consolidated the formal language lessons I was taking outside the classroom, incidentally, by going about my job of au pair.
    I want to encourage my students to appreciate how much they are learning informally and encourage them to do more of it (it's free, and they don't have much cash).

    Just adding a definition of informal learning that I found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Informal_learning
    "Informal learning is, by default, any learning that is not formal learning or non-formal learning. Informal learning is organized differently than formal and non-formal learning because it has no set objective in terms of learning outcomes and is never intentional from the learner’s standpoint. Often it is referred to as learning by experience or just as experience. For all learners this includes heuristic language building, socialization, inculturation, and play. Informal learning is a persistent and pervasive ongoing phenomena of learning via participation or learning via knowledge creation, in contrast with the traditional view of teacher-centered learning via knowledge acquisition."
    Will edit later.
    Is it possible to measure/identify informal learning?
    ** Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is I don't know which half.
    John Wanamaker, (attributed) US department store merchant (1838 - 1922)
    Does this quote match the informal learning situation?

    (view changes)
    7:24 am
  5. page Formal -- informal edited http://www.infed.org/informal_education/informality_and_formalization.htm http://www.infed.org…

    http://www.infed.org/informal_education/informality_and_formalization.htm
    http://www.infed.org/informal_education/informality_and_formalization.htm
    This article is from the American Psychological Society and appears in Psychological Science and looks at incidental learning. I find this quite interesting as most sources point to the time it takes for immigrants to develop linguistic competence without formal learning and therefore focus on strategies for skill development.
    {Incidental Language Learning - Listening out of the corner of your ear.pdf}
    Just adding a definition of informal learning that I found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Informal_learning
    "Informal learning is, by default, any learning that is not formal learning or non-formal learning. Informal learning is organized differently than formal and non-formal learning because it has no set objective in terms of learning outcomes and is never intentional from the learner’s standpoint. Often it is referred to as learning by experience or just as experience. For all learners this includes heuristic language building, socialization, inculturation, and play. Informal learning is a persistent and pervasive ongoing phenomena of learning via participation or learning via knowledge creation, in contrast with the traditional view of teacher-centered learning via knowledge acquisition."
    Will edit later.

    (view changes)
    7:17 am

Wednesday, October 15

  1. msg Dewey and Vygotsky message posted Dewey and Vygotsky I don't know we can ever be certain, but I don't think that it is believed that Dewey and Vygotsky …
    Dewey and Vygotsky
    I don't know we can ever be certain, but I don't think that it is believed that Dewey and Vygotsky knew about each other's work. The world was a very separate place in those days for one thing and then there was a language barrier. Vygotsky wasn't really know about in the west until the 1970s when his work was first translated.
    6:27 am

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